Friday 01 July 2022

News Analysed, Opinions Expressed

NEWSMAN

Denials, contradictions & Bhopal tragedy

 

Where were you in December 1984? It's a question raised with unfailing regularity across the news media in the last fortnight as the verdict in the Bhopal gas tragedy was handed out by a lower court. Octogenarian politicians, diplomats and bureaucrats - a majority of whom are well past their use by date - have been wheeled out to try and answer a single question: who let Union Carbide boss Warren Anderson out of India within a week of the country's worst industrial disaster?READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.

Why India is a minnow in world football

 

It also isn't as if Indians aren't passionate about football. Watch a game in Margao, Shillong or Kozhikode, and the exuberance of the fans can match the best in the world. I have deliberately left out Kolkata, the home of Indian football, because Kolkata at one level has come to symbolise the decline of the sport. For Kolkatans, football for the longest time was about narrow parochialism: East Bengal versus Mohun Bagan was the life and death contest. READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.

An Open Letter to Manmohan Singh

 

From Pakistan to financial reform to speeding up highway projects , there is much else that remains to be done. At this rate, retirement and handing over power to a 'younger' leadership may be a long way away!READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.

English-speaking, educated politicians soft target

 

The problem is that both Tharoor and Ramesh are upper-caste politicians with no mass base. Tharoor is a Nair, Ramesh a Mysore Brahmin. Tharoor was parachuted into the Lok Sabha from Thiruvanthapuram because of his proximity to the Congress leadership. Ramesh was made a Rajya Sabha member from Andhra Pradesh, again because he had a special relationship with the party's high command. READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.

Politics is far more slippery than cricket

 

Just a month ago, it appeared that Lalit Modi and his team were here to stay forever. It took one tweet to bring down the entire edifice. Politics is far more slippery than cricket. This April has been open season in cricket. Next year, it could well be the case in politics.READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.

The politics of victimhood

 

Central to the imagery of the politician as 'victim' is the role of the media, in particular the English language media, as a seemingly 'hostile' force. For Mayawati, the media is 'manuwadi', an upper caste, upper class dominated elite group that cannot stomach the idea of a Dalit woman in power. For Modi, the media is a collection of secular fundamentalists who are anti-Gujarat, anti-Hindu, and by extension, anti-national. READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.

Running out of steam

 

In a sense, Lalu and his Yadav soulmates - Mulayam and Sharad - represent the past tense of Indian politics, a politics where identity mattered more than issues.READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.

The age of extremes

 

We still don't have a Fox News equivalent in India - although a few channels have slipped dangerously in that direction - but the dilemma of what constitutes 'fair' and 'balanced' television is universal. On Indian news television, the escape route has been to ensure that any discussion programme represents strikingly contrary viewpoints. READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.

An open letter to Uddhav Thackeray

 

Your defeat seems to have convinced you that the only way forward is to outdo your cousin in parochial politics. It's a strategy which has undoubtedly made you a headline-grabber once again. Unfortunately, television rating points don't get you votes or goodwill. READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.

Indo-Pak schizophrenia over IPL

 

If the star Pakistani players were considered good enough to be listed for an auction on January 6th, what suddenly changed within a fortnight for them to be seen as a risky proposition? READ

Disclaimer: Views expressed above are the author's own.



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I think Tharoor's comments on twitter are not in sync with India's conservative humour.

 
Kalidas Sawkar |

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Rajdeep Sardesai

One of India’s most respected journalists, Rajdeep Sardesai, has nearly three decades of journalistic experience in print and tv. He has been the founder- editor of chief of IBN 18 network, which included CNN IBN. Prior to setting up the IBN network, he was the managing editor of NDTV 24 x 7 and NDTV India. Rajdeep has won more than 100 national and international awards for journalism, including the Padma Shri in 2008. He is currently consulting editor at the India Today group.

 

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